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  1. #1
    Guizmo Guest

    Default Free and/or Opensource components

    Is there an Open-Xchange version which installation would bring all the needed groupware components ready to be used ?

    By this i mean things like LDAP (with OpenLDAP for example), Mail server (with Postfix for example), IMAP (with Cyrus for example), FTP (with ProFTPd for example), SSL support, Antivirus (Clamav for example), Antispam (SpamAssassin for example) and so on...

    If the answer is negative, please consider this as a suggestion
    Last edited by Guizmo; 07-01-2007 at 07:23 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Germany
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    Default

    Open-Xchange Express Edition brings all it needs on a single installation CD. (www.open-xchange.com)
    OK, no LDAP and FTP, but webdav access for file transfer.

    Open-Xchange 5 also uses all needed services of the chosen Distribution (RHEL4 or SLES9).
    Last edited by Martin Heiland; 07-01-2007 at 07:51 PM.

  3. #3
    Guizmo Guest

    Default

    I didn't mention Open-Xchange Express Edition because as i understand it, it transforms a pc to an Open-Xchange box which quite quite problematic when we already have a box running many software

    Based on your answer, and except LDAP and FTP, what are the components included into Open-Xchange 5 ?

    Anyway, that would be cool for the community release too.
    By curiosity, is it possible to run Open-Xchange on MacOS ?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Germany
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    Default

    Open-Xchange 5 does not contain any other software than groupware. The needed software is configured from the packages, the distribution provides. Open-Xchange 5 also uses OpenLDAP provided by the distribution. Express does not use ldap at all.

    > By curiosity, is it possible to run Open-Xchange on MacOS ?
    Yes, it is, some developer work on osx only.
    It may even run on wind... ok, forget it
    Last edited by Martin Heiland; 07-01-2007 at 08:19 PM.

  5. #5
    Guizmo Guest

    Default

    Thanks Martin for your answers.
    Maybe a technical comparison page regarding the "4 products" would be useful for everyone.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Germany
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    Default

    Yep. we are also working on such a page (again) - it existed before the migration to the new website.

  7. #7
    Guizmo Guest

    Default

    To conclude on the subject, and for those who would like to have most of these components but without the hard installation process, would the following be a bad idea :
    - installing Kolab http://www.kolab.org/
    - and then installing Open-Xchange 0.8

    A good distribution already brings all the components we talked about but the nice thing would be to have all of them preconfigured for an Open-Xchange usage, which may be what Hyperion proposes

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Germany
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    Default

    BTW: You may look over here for some version information:
    http://www.open-xchange.com/wiki/ind..._and_Numbering

  9. #9
    Guizmo Guest

    Default

    I've just suscribed to an 1&1 hosting space area managed by Plesk which handle qMail and not Postfix. Would you advice me to use qMail with Hyperion or to disable qMail and then install Hyperion ? (Hyperion comes with postfix or at least with its mail server if i well understood)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Germany
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    Hi,

    Hyperion from the CVS does not contain any other server software except the groupware and groupware backend services. It's designed to be standards compliant, so there is not "must use this and this" but recommendations. I already set up a Hyperion for personal use from the CVS sources and after some initial work, i did a full setup in about 3 hours, where about 2 hours are for fine tuning the mail system, optimizing apache and stuff like that. The entry to a successful installation is not very easy at the moment i have to admit, but after the configuration and logic behind all this become clear, its nice to administer.

    These are the relevant software components i used:
    Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 (Etch), Linux 2.6.18-smp-amd64
    Apache httpd 2.2.3 (mod_expires, mod_deflate, mod_ssl, mod_jk)
    Cyrus IMAPd 2.2.13-10 (imapd, admin, common)
    MySQL Server / Client 5.0.32
    Postfix SMTP 2.3.8-2 (with mysql support)
    Sun Java 5 1.5.0-10-3

    All packages are taken from the debian repositories (java from non-free). The installation has been done according to the steps documented at the wiki. You are free to try any imap/smtp/pop3 server you like but i made best experiences with the cyrus/postfix solution. Other mail backends like qmail, courier, dovecot etc. should also work.

    I am not sure what exactly your plans are, do you want to use the 1&1 space for the mail system only and let the groupware run on another host? You will not succeed in configuring and compiling the whole system via a management tool like plesk, real console access is required. It is possible to install the groupware on another host than the mail, storage or database subsytem but this requires additional configuration. Note that there is no single-click installer available yet, but i am working on such a tool in spare time. I recommend to start on a real "plain" host system, like a Debian 4.0 in VMWare to take a first impression about the installation and configuration process.
    Last edited by Martin Heiland; 07-04-2007 at 01:38 AM.

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